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Vaccination uptake in HF patients; identifying a critical gap of care

Session Poster Session 4

Speaker Faizan Rathore

Event : Heart Failure 2019

  • Topic : heart failure
  • Sub-topic : Chronic Heart Failure: Multidisciplinary Interventions
  • Session type : Poster Session

Authors : F Rathore (Dublin,IE), RB Pharithi (Dublin,IE), K Mcdonald (Dublin,IE)

Authors:
F Rathore1 , RB Pharithi1 , K Mcdonald1 , 1St Vincent's University Hospital, Department of Cardiology - Dublin - Ireland ,

Citation:

Background

Influenza vaccine (IV) & Pneumococcal vaccine(PV) are recommended by multiple heart failure (HF) guidelines. However, despite its importance, poor uptake among HF population has been reported.

In a recent study of precipitants of HF hospitalisation, Lower Respiratory tract infection (LRTI )was identified as a single most common cause of admission in 35 % (n= 47) cases, hence, we sought to investigate the uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines and assess the relationship between the adherence to vaccine and subsequent LRTI-precipitated hospital admission.

Methods

Vaccination history was obtained at time of hospitalization.
IV uptake was defined as having the vaccine administered in the previous year,
PV uptake was defined as having the vaccine administered at all in the past

The relationship between Vaccination uptake & HF phenotype (using LVEF 50% as a cutoff) was assessed, along with the relationship between vaccination uptake, LRTI & de novo diagnosis v/s known HF presentation.

Chi-square & Fisher exact test were carried out , with p value<0.05 considered significant

Results
Of the total number of patients analysed (n=127 for IV & n=122 for PV), 67% (n=85 (Denovo HF =41, Known HF=44)) were up to date with IV, and 29% (n=35(Denovo HF =17, Known HF=18)) were up to date with PV.
Statistical Analysis revealed patients HFpEF phenotype were more likely to be up to date with IV (p=0.009) & PV (p=0.033)
A statistically significant relationship was observed between Known HF patients who had received the IV & LRTI as a precipitant (p=0.038)
No statistically significant relationship was observed between PV & any of the variables of interest

Conclusion

Our findings represent a poor uptake, especially of pneumococcal vaccines in Irish HF population, which is a comparable finding to the reported literature, representing a critical gap of care in HF patients that should be addressed on an urgent basis.
HFpEF phenotype was observed more likely to be up to date with vaccinations which could be reflective of advanced age & higher comorbidity burden of HFpEF population
We observed that LRTI was less likely to precipitate hospitalization in known HF patients, who were up to date with IV compared to patients who were up to date with IV and present as a de novo diagnosis of HF

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