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Association of biomarkers of oxidative stress, stress glycaemia and glycated haemoglobin with coronary artery disease

Session Poster Session 2

Speaker Associate Professor Marija Vavlukis

Congress : Acute Cardiovascular Care 2019

  • Topic : coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, acute cardiac care
  • Sub-topic : Acute Coronary Syndromes: Biomarkers
  • Session type : Poster Session
  • FP Number : P491

Authors : M Vavlukis (Skopje,MK), G Kamceva (Stip,MK), D Kitanoski (Skopje,MK), E Shehu (Skopje,MK), H Taravari (Skopje,MK), B Pocesta (Skopje,MK), S Kedev (Skopje,MK), LJ Georgievska-Ismail (Skopje,MK)

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Authors:
M Vavlukis1 , G Kamceva2 , D Kitanoski1 , E Shehu1 , H Taravari1 , B Pocesta1 , S Kedev1 , LJ Georgievska-Ismail1 , 1University Clinic for Cardiology - Skopje - Macedonia The Former Yugoslav Republic of , 2University Goce Delcev, Clinical Hospital - Stip - Macedonia The Former Yugoslav Republic of ,

On behalf: none

Citation:

Introduction: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for generalized oxidation which results in cell dysfunction, necrosis or apoptosis. Assessment of oxidative stress markers could modify course of treatment of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).
The aim of this study was to evaluate association of markers of oxidative stress, stress glycaemia and glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) with CAD.
Methods: Cross-sectional observational study. Variables: demographics, risk factors and co-morbidities, lipoprotein and glycemic profile, oxidative stress biomarkers: malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydro peroxide (HP), and antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), CATALASE and glutathione peroxidase (GPS). Comparison was performed between CAD patients and healthy controls, patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) versus chronic CAD, and between PCI revascularised and stable post MI patients.
Results: 300 patients, (64.7% m/36.3% f), mean age 62±11 y. (p=ns between genders). 187 (62.3%) were ACS and 113 (37.7%) chronic CAD patients. There was no statistical significant difference in the risk profile between the CAD groups. Patients with CAD had significantly higher pro-oxidative and significantly lower anti-oxidative levels of biomarkers (Table 1), as compared with healthy volunteers. Statistically significant differences were observed for HP and SOD between ACS and HCAD group. In HCAD group, revascularized patients demonstrated higher oxidative stress as compared to stable post MI patients. In ACS patients statistical significant intergroup difference was registered, but not pointing to the single type of ACS. ACS patients had also higher levels of stress glycaemia and HgbA1c. Significant positive correlation were found for HgbA1c and stress glycaemia with MDA (r=,154**, p=0,008; r=,254**, p=0,024 respectively).
Conclusion: CAD patients demonstrated pronounced oxidative stress when compared to healthy controls, ACS patients had higher oxidative stress as compared with chronic CAD patients, PCI sub-group performed worse that stable post MI patients. Higher oxidative stress activity was linked to worse glycemic control as measured threw stress glycaemia and HbA1c.

Patients subgroup

Nr

Marker of oxidative stress

MDA

(nm/ml)

HP

(CARR U)

SOD

(U/ml)

CAT

(KU/L)

GPX

(U/ml)

CAD

Healy volunteers

p

300

30

34,1±9,1

22,2±6,7

<0,00001

282,7±73,9

240,5 ±62,2

<0,00185

131,7±113,0

358,7±180,9

<0,00001

64,6±38,1

99,1±36,7

<0,000013

6,4±6,0

7,0±5,5

ns

ACS

HCAD

p

187

113

34,3±7.6

33,2±7,9

ns

293,6±76,3

256,1±72,1

0,0102

118,8±106,9

153,2±119,9

0,0031

63,2±39,5

66,8±36,8

ns

6,5±6,9

6,3±4,9

ns

Asymptomatic HCAD

PCI revascularized

Post MI

p

17

30

66

33,5±5,8

34,8±0,6

33,6±6,4

ns

336,1±92,0

285,3±61,9

260,3±68,4

0,0006

129,7±114,7

101,9±76,9

182,2±122,1

0,0010

78,3±40,9

52,5±34,6

70,5±33,3

0,0394

5,1±4,5

5,9±4,5

7,3±5,6

ns

STEMI

NSTEMI

APNS

p

84

22

81

34,6±9,7

30,2±6,1

34,9±10,9

0,0441

278,8±68,9

307,3±73,4

286,1±77,1

0,0719

106,8±91,1

82,8±79,0

140,4±123,5

0,034

67,0±37,1

63,6±31,8

59,3±39,5

ns

4,7±5,7

7,9±5,4

7,9±8,8

0,0314

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