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Tongue coating microbiome data distinguish patients with chronic heart failure from healthy

Session HFA Discoveries - ePublications

Speaker Tianhui Yuan

Event : HFA Discoveries 2020

  • Topic : heart failure
  • Sub-topic : Chronic Heart Failure – Diagnostic Methods: Biomarkers
  • Session type : ePublication

Authors : TH Yuan (Guangzhou,CN), XT Jiang (Guangzhou,CN), JM Wen (Guangzhou,CN), Y Wang (Guangzhou,CN), H Wu (Guangzhou,CN), J Chen (Guangzhou,CN), ZH Wang (Guangzhou,CN), QY Chen (Guangzhou,CN), J Li (Guangzhou,CN), ZQ Yang (Guangzhou,CN), SX Xian (Guangzhou,CN)

Authors:
TH Yuan1 , XT Jiang2 , JM Wen2 , Y Wang2 , H Wu1 , J Chen1 , ZH Wang1 , QY Chen2 , J Li1 , ZQ Yang1 , SX Xian1 , 1No.1 Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese medicine - Guangzhou - China , 2Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine - Guangzhou - China ,

Citation:

Background: Clinically, there exists difference in tongue images including tongue coating and tongue color between chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and healthy individuals. Recent reports have suggested alteration in the tongue microbiota,which may play a critical role in diseases .  CHF-associated tongue coating microbiome dysbiosis has not yet been clearly defined.

Purpose: Our aim is to investigate the composition of the tongue microbiome in subjects with and without CHF,which may provide a new impetus to solve the insufficiency of biomarkers in guiding the management of CHF.

Methods: A prospective case control study were performed 60 CHF patients and 30 health controls would have been studied by sequencing technology of the 16S rRNA gene of the V3-V4 hyper variable region with an Illumina MiSeq. The sequenced data were analyzed using QIIME, and the sequences obtained were distributed across 7 phyla, 27 genera and 825 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). If the subject had oral, tongue or dental diseases; suffered upper respiratory tract infection in the past week; used antibiotics and immunosuppressants in the past week; and pregnant or in lactation,it would have been excluded.

Results: In total, 42 CHF patients with NYHA class II-IV and disease duration from 2 to 5 years,and 28 healthy controls were recruited. The overall tongue microbial community (both alpha and beta diversity) differed between patients with CHF and healthy control (P<0.05). Heart failure patients group was characterized by a dominant of Neisseria, Capnocytophaga, Lactobacillus, Phocaeicola, Anaeroglobus, Butyrivibrio, Bacteroides and Abiotrophia ( P<0.05, P<0.001 ) , while TM7_genus_incertae_sedis, Solobacterium, eubacterium, Murdochiella, Treponema_93, Anaerovorax, kingella, Peptococcus and Mogibacterium were preponderant in the healthy control group( P<0.05, P<0.001 ). Strikingly, Capnocytophaga, TM7_genus_incertae_sedis, Peptostreptococcus, Solobacterium and Eubacterium could distinguish CHF patients from healthy control (AUC: 83.7%, 95% confidential interval 74.1%–93.3%). The abundance of Eubacterium and Solobacterium in NYHA class II, III and IV were lower than that in normal controls. In addition, the abundance of Eubacterium and Solobacterium seem showed a downward trend with heart functional grade decreasing.

Conclusion: Our findings identified the microbiota dysbiosis of the tongue coat in CHF patients, and provide insight into the association between the human microbiome and CHF. It is worth to explore the underlying mechanisms between tongue coating microbiome and cardiac function.

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